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This Week in the Movement

Old News by Kyronsdf on flickr

Throughout the week, we keep people up-to-date with information about the Death with Dignity movement and other topics related to end-of-life care through Facebook and Twitter. Below are highlights from this week.

Efforts regarding Death with Dignity:

Read more: This Week in the Movement

Euphemisms for Death

Deadness cartoon by Frank Cotham care of the New Yorker magazine

Wear wooden pajamas, to smell the flowers from below, popped their clogs, to swallow one's birth certificate, to eat dandelions by the roots, to leave one's teeth, to pull the leathers, to kick the calendar, to put the car away, to not eat mangoes next season, to turn at the corner...

These are just some of my favorite euphemisms for death I learned through yesterday's weekly conversation about death and dying on Twitter. Euphemisms for death was the topic for this week's chat hosted by advocate Nora Miller. (Symplur captured the transcript from our TweetChat if you're interested in reading it.)

Read more: Euphemisms for Death

This Week in the Movement

News As It Happens by Janne Moren on flickr

Throughout the week, we keep people up-to-date with information about the Death with Dignity movement and other topics related to end-of-life care through Facebook and Twitter. Below are highlights from this week.

Efforts regarding Death with Dignity:

Read more: This Week in the Movement

Boston Public Radio Discussion of Massachusetts Death with Dignity

Vote Aqui care of Boston Public Radio

Boston Public Radio hosted a vibrant dialogue this week around the Massachusetts Death with Dignity ballot measure Bay Staters will vote on this November. Several key discussion points were addressed by radio host Callie Crossley as she engaged Dr. Marcia Angell, supporter of the proposed Massachusetts Death with Dignity Act, physician, former editor-in-chief of the New England Journal of Medicine, and Dr. Lynda Young, an opponent of the proposed law.

From this short 30-minute broadcast I've extracted a handful of gems I think you'll enjoy. And I encourage you to take a little break from your day to listen and tell us your favorite quotes in the comments below, on Facebook, and through Twitter.

From the start, Dr. Angell helped listeners understand what the initiative is and described her confusion about how anyone would oppose it:

In my mind the real question is "why would anyone oppose it?" This Act merely permits dying patients, ones who find their suffering unendurable and who can't find the relief that they want, permits such patients to ask their physician for a medication that would allow them to end their lives somewhat earlier. These people are dying; remember that. Allow these patients to die a little more peacefully.

Read more: Boston Public Radio Discussion of Massachusetts Death with Dignity

This Week in the Movement

News stand by David on flickr

Throughout the week, we keep people up-to-date with information about the Death with Dignity movement and other topics related to end-of-life care through Facebook and Twitter. Below are highlights from this week.

Efforts regarding Death with Dignity:

  • "It's clear: success of our ever growing Death with Dignity movement relies on partnerships between us, as a national organization, local grassroots groups, and people who support our efforts."
  • In his thoughtful op-ed, John Culver from Gonzaga University explained, "They are imposing their personal perspective on life and death onto their fellow man and dictating their response to terminal illness. Limiting the range of options available to terminally ill individuals represents the height of self-righteous regulation of the activities of others."
  • Dr. John Grohol, founder of PsychCentral responded to an opponent's flimsy argument in an op-ed from earlier in the week.
  • About.com's Anthony Cirillo shared important information about usage of the Oregon Death with Dignity Act.

Read more: This Week in the Movement

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Defend dignity. Take action.

You are the key to ensuring well-crafted Death with Dignity laws for all Americans. With your financial and volunteer help, the Death with Dignity National Center, a 501(c)(3), non-partisan, non-profit organization, has been the leading advocate in the death with dignity movement. Member contributions helped us pass a new Death with Dignity law in Washington, defend the Oregon law, and provide education and outreach programs for the vitality of the death with dignity movement.

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