Personal Stories

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In the Death with Dignity movement we all have experiences to share. These are our constituents' personal stories of courage, pain, joy, fear, sadness and hope.

To tell your story and help others understand why Death with Dignity laws are important please send an email to Melissa.

Always remember: you are not alone.

A Christian Argument For Physician Assisted Death

Rainbow by Rachel Coyle

Brittany Maynard's story has prompted discussions about our model legislation, the Oregon Death with Dignity Act, throughout the US. Over the last week, we've heard from hundreds of people in support of Death with Dignity. The guest post below by Rachel Coyle is republished with permission. The article originally appeared on Rachel's blog, Of a Moderation.

I have watched a lot of people die.

After college, I spent nearly two years providing patient care in the emergency department of a Level 1 trauma center. Today, I work with hospice patients, offering comfort to those who have 6 months or less to live.

I am also blessed with a big, loving, Catholic family. Our faith has played a major role in shaping each of us throughout the years.

In fact, it's safe to say religion has played a major role in every aspect of my life.

Yet I firmly believe in the right of our terminally ill to die with dignity.

Read more: A Christian Argument For Physician Assisted Death

Never Say Die: Why can't we embrace life's most inevitable fact--that it will end?

Brittany Maynard, image from interview with CBS

Brittany Maynard's story has prompted discussions about our model legislation, the Oregon Death with Dignity Act, throughout the US. Over the last week, we've heard from hundreds of people in support of Death with Dignity. The guest post below by Glenn Hodges is republished with permission. Glenn is a journalist (formerly with National Geographic and The Washington Monthly). The article originally appeared on Glenn's blog, Sounding Line.

It has been a busy month for death—or, more accurately, since death is always busy, a busy month for the discussion of death.

First, in mid-September, Ezekiel Emanuel caused a stir by writing in The Atlantic that he wanted to die at age 75, before his faculties dimmed too much, before his life became a litany of medical concerns. "Dying at 75 will not be a tragedy," he wrote. "Death is a loss...But here is a simple truth that many of us seem to resist: living too long is also a loss."

Read more: Never Say Die: Why can't we embrace life's most inevitable fact--that it will end?

Death with Dignity: A daughter's perspective after a prolonged, painful death

Amy Neese's father

Brittany Maynard's story has prompted discussions about our model legislation, the Oregon Death with Dignity Act, throughout the US. Over the last week, we've heard from hundreds of people in support of Death with Dignity. The guest post below by Amy Neese is republished with permission. The article originally appeared on Amy's blog, Life, Laughter and a Double Espresso.

My thoughts are with a woman I've never met. 29-year-old Brittany Maynard lives with her husband in Portland, Oregon. She's beautiful, with shoulder-length brown hair and light eyes. She adores her family, loves to travel and Nov. 1, Brittany will die.

Brittany has an incurable, aggressive form of brain cancer. After two unsuccessful surgeries, Brittany's only treatment option is full brain radiation. However, the side effects from the treatment could destroy her quality of life for the little time she has left. She could die in hospice, but run the risk of developing morphine-resistant pain. While the cancer eats away at her brain, she could experience personality changes and a loss of verbal, cognitive and motor skills.

Read more: Death with Dignity: A daughter's perspective after a prolonged, painful death

Brittany Maynard's Decision to Die with Dignity

Brittany Maynard with her Great Dane, Charlie. Photo by Dan Diaz

A young woman named Brittany Maynard, like so many others, has a compelling story to share. She is bravely facing her death with dignity and control, and when the time is right, she may choose to hasten her own death. If you're not from Oregon, you might wonder how she can do that. In fact, our phones have been steadily ringing due to callers wanting to learn more about Death with Dignity.

In Oregon, Death with Dignity has been legal for 20 years. The Oregon Death with Dignity Act allows mentally competent, terminally ill adults with six months or fewer to live the right to request medication to hasten their deaths. Once a person completes the request process and receives the prescribed medication, it's fully in the patient's hands to decide whether or when to take the medication, and about a third of the people who request the prescribed medication never take it.

Our hearts go out to Brittany and her family. She and her husband were trying for a family when the news came. After suffering from crippling headaches for months, she learned she had brain cancer in January, 2014. Hardly a year after getting married and 29 years old—her whole life ahead of her—her life was turned upside down in a moment.

Read more: Brittany Maynard's Decision to Die with Dignity

Goodbye to Jumpy: Lessons for the Health System

Hamster care of cdrussorusso on flicker

This article by Janice Lynch Schuster was originally published on American Society on Aging's Aging Today, and is republished with permission by the author. Janice hosted a discussion about this article during our #DWDchat on Thursday. All are welcome to join our weekly, one-hour Twitter chats each Thursday at 4:00pmPT/7:00pmET.

Janice Lynch Schuster is the co-author of Handbook for Mortals: Guidance for People Facing Serious Illness (New York: Oxford University Press, 2011). She is a senior writer for the Altarum Institute in Washington, D.C.

Read more: Goodbye to Jumpy: Lessons for the Health System

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You are the key to ensuring well-crafted Death with Dignity laws for all Americans. With your financial and volunteer help, the Death with Dignity National Center, a 501(c)(3), non-partisan, nonprofit organization, has been the leading advocate in the Death with Dignity movement. Individual contributions helped us pass new Death with Dignity laws in Washington and Vermont, defend the Oregon law, and provide education and outreach programs for the vitality of the Death with Dignity movement.

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