Guest Blogger

The Death with Dignity movement appeals to people from all walks of life, and we'd like your help in expanding our community. Are you interested in adding your voice to the Death with Dignity movement? Consider publishing a guest post on our Living with Dying blog.

To have your piece considered for Living with Dying:

  • You must be a Death with Dignity National Center supporter (if you aren't, we'll sign you up).
  • Email us to discuss ideas and topics for your 600-900 word post. Include a brief bio.
  • Once your post is up, invite your friends and family to read it.

Please note that by submitting your guest blog post to us you

  1. grant Death with Dignity National Center (DDNC) permission to use your guest blog post, or any portions of it, on our blog and elsewhere in our communications or to not use it for any reason;
  2. certify that you have all the rights, power, and authority necessary to make the submission;
  3. agree to not hold DDNC responsible or liable for any use of your guest blog post;
  4. agree that any uses by DDNC of your guest blog post are made with no compensation to you;
  5. certify that the language and contents of your guest blog post are not plagiarized from any other source and do not libel or slander any other party and that you assume full responsibility for any damages resulting from any claims to the contrary; and
  6. understand that your email address will be added to our list to receive occasional updates.

We look forward to reading your work.

Intimate Conversations about Love and Loss

Encountering the Edge by Karen Kaplan

Karen Kaplan is an ordained rabbi and served as a hospice chaplain for seven years. Learn more about Encountering the Edge and read book excerpts on the publisher's site or Amazon. You can also see Karen's own blog, Offbeat Compassion.

Death with Dignity National Center's Melissa Barber asked me as I prepared this post, "Why did you write this book?" This is something every author should keep in mind throughout the writing process. It implies, among many other things, that a solidly cogent answer must precede the genesis of any worthwhile book.

While writing my hospice chaplain memoir, I kept in mind how the author of Ecclesiastes admonished his son: "Of making many books there is no end; and much study is a weariness of the flesh." And I was acutely conscious of needing abundant justification for writing Encountering the Edge: What People Told Me Before They Died.

Melissa's question is also an excellent tool for self-reflection. It's one thing to explain what a reader might get out of it, and quite another for authors to delve into the spiritual reasons underlying their endeavors. (The psychological reason is yet another dimension, and this is dealt with in the book.) I'll now endeavor to take on both challenges.

Read more: Intimate Conversations about Love and Loss

Facing Death Together

Brant Huddleston

After 17 years working for IBM, Brant Huddleston left the corporate world and became an entrepreneur. He's recently started the Dance to Death Afterlife podcast to learn, with his listeners, about death and dying in an upbeat and educational way. You can follow the podcast on Twitter: @D2DAfterlife or Facebook.

Today is the tomorrow you worried about yesterday....and all is well.

The last time I saw my brother was on a boat in the middle of the Severn River near Annapolis, Maryland. It was summer, and the family had gathered to spread his ashes. John died in April 1992 at age 39, just three weeks after the death of my father. It was a hard year.

Read more: Facing Death Together

Bridging the Hospice Gap

Mark Dimor

Mark Dimor founded The BioContinuum Group, Inc. (BCG) with the mission to develop healthcare advertising, marketing, medical education, and strategic planning for clients. Four years ago in response to a personal tragedy he began writing, advocating, and speaking about end-of-life, palliative care, caregiving, and hospice. His goal: find meaning to these events. What he discovered was an unmet need. He's applying his 30+ years of marketing, communications, learning, and strategic expertise to these topics to educate and convince others of its value.

"The important thing is that when you come to understand something, you act on it, no matter how small that act is. Eventually it will take you where you need to go." Sister Helen Prejean

Read more: Bridging the Hospice Gap

Lessons Learned from Being a Caregiver for My Grandma

Irina's grandmother, Grunya

Irina Jordan was born and raised in Russia and moved to the US when she was 22 years old. She's the owner of Artisurn—online marketplace of handcrafted cremation urns, jewelry and keepsakes. Connector. Optimist. Avid reader.

My paternal grandmother, Grunya, had a stroke which paralyzed the left half of her body when she was 59 years old. She spent her entire life living in a village in the far east area of Russia raising her own chickens, milking her own cows, and planting her own fruits and vegetables. After her stroke, she had to leave her rural life behind and move in with us.

We lived in Khabarovsk, a big city by Amur River on the east side of Russia. I was 10 years old. In Russia, it's expected children take care of their aging parents and not place them in any kind of assisted living facilities.

I became my mother's helper: helping feed my grandma, get her around, make her bed, do her laundry and monitor her medications. My grandma lived with us for 5 years until she died at the age of 64.

Read more: Lessons Learned from Being a Caregiver for My Grandma

Join National Healthcare Decisions Day...Because Your Decisions Matter

National Healthcare Decisions Day

Nathan Kottkamp is the founder and chair of National Healthcare Decisions Day.

Please help us make history, again. April 16, 2014, will be the seventh annual National Healthcare Decisions Day. The inaugural event, which was formally recognized by Congress and numerous state and local governments, included participation by 76 of the most prominent national healthcare, religious, and legal associations and organizations. By the second year, we over 700 local and state organizations throughout the country also participated. At every level, the goal of this nationwide initiative is to ensure that all adults with decision-making capacity in America have both the information and the opportunity to communicate and document their future healthcare decisions. The first year's results were impressive—over 750,000 people obtained resources to make their healthcare decisions known—but there remain millions of Americans to go.

Read more: Join National Healthcare Decisions Day...Because Your Decisions Matter

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Defend dignity. Take action.

You are the key to ensuring well-crafted Death with Dignity laws for all Americans. With your financial and volunteer help, the Death with Dignity National Center, a 501(c)(3), non-partisan, nonprofit organization, has been the leading advocate in the Death with Dignity movement. Individual contributions helped us pass new Death with Dignity laws in Washington and Vermont, defend the Oregon law, and provide education and outreach programs for the vitality of the Death with Dignity movement.

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