Guest Blogger

Many of the most successful blogs have an element in common: a diverse voice. Blogs partly came about, after all, from a desire for an interactive way to get information and to have a community of people participating in the discussions.

The Death with Dignity movement appeals to people from all walks of life, and we'd like your help in expanding our community. Interested in adding your voice to the Death with Dignity movement?

To have your piece considered for our blog, Living with Dying:

  • You must be a Death with Dignity National Center supporter.
  • Send your Death with Dignity-related article (700-1,000 words) to me via email.
  • Once your post is up, convince your friends and family to read it.

We look forward to reading your work.

A Christian Argument For Physician Assisted Death

Rainbow by Rachel Coyle

Brittany Maynard's story has prompted discussions about our model legislation, the Oregon Death with Dignity Act, throughout the US. Over the last week, we've heard from hundreds of people in support of Death with Dignity. The guest post below by Rachel Coyle is republished with permission. The article originally appeared on Rachel's blog, Of a Moderation.

I have watched a lot of people die.

After college, I spent nearly two years providing patient care in the emergency department of a Level 1 trauma center. Today, I work with hospice patients, offering comfort to those who have 6 months or less to live.

I am also blessed with a big, loving, Catholic family. Our faith has played a major role in shaping each of us throughout the years.

In fact, it's safe to say religion has played a major role in every aspect of my life.

Yet I firmly believe in the right of our terminally ill to die with dignity.

Read more: A Christian Argument For Physician Assisted Death

Never Say Die: Why can't we embrace life's most inevitable fact--that it will end?

Brittany Maynard, image from interview with CBS

Brittany Maynard's story has prompted discussions about our model legislation, the Oregon Death with Dignity Act, throughout the US. Over the last week, we've heard from hundreds of people in support of Death with Dignity. The guest post below by Glenn Hodges is republished with permission. Glenn is a journalist (formerly with National Geographic and The Washington Monthly). The article originally appeared on Glenn's blog, Sounding Line.

It has been a busy month for death—or, more accurately, since death is always busy, a busy month for the discussion of death.

First, in mid-September, Ezekiel Emanuel caused a stir by writing in The Atlantic that he wanted to die at age 75, before his faculties dimmed too much, before his life became a litany of medical concerns. "Dying at 75 will not be a tragedy," he wrote. "Death is a loss...But here is a simple truth that many of us seem to resist: living too long is also a loss."

Read more: Never Say Die: Why can't we embrace life's most inevitable fact--that it will end?

Death with Dignity: A daughter's perspective after a prolonged, painful death

Amy Neese's father

Brittany Maynard's story has prompted discussions about our model legislation, the Oregon Death with Dignity Act, throughout the US. Over the last week, we've heard from hundreds of people in support of Death with Dignity. The guest post below by Amy Neese is republished with permission. The article originally appeared on Amy's blog, Life, Laughter and a Double Espresso.

My thoughts are with a woman I've never met. 29-year-old Brittany Maynard lives with her husband in Portland, Oregon. She's beautiful, with shoulder-length brown hair and light eyes. She adores her family, loves to travel and Nov. 1, Brittany will die.

Brittany has an incurable, aggressive form of brain cancer. After two unsuccessful surgeries, Brittany's only treatment option is full brain radiation. However, the side effects from the treatment could destroy her quality of life for the little time she has left. She could die in hospice, but run the risk of developing morphine-resistant pain. While the cancer eats away at her brain, she could experience personality changes and a loss of verbal, cognitive and motor skills.

Read more: Death with Dignity: A daughter's perspective after a prolonged, painful death

Goodbye to Jumpy: Lessons for the Health System

Hamster care of cdrussorusso on flicker

This article by Janice Lynch Schuster was originally published on American Society on Aging's Aging Today, and is republished with permission by the author. Janice hosted a discussion about this article during our #DWDchat on Thursday. All are welcome to join our weekly, one-hour Twitter chats each Thursday at 4:00pmPT/7:00pmET.

Janice Lynch Schuster is the co-author of Handbook for Mortals: Guidance for People Facing Serious Illness (New York: Oxford University Press, 2011). She is a senior writer for the Altarum Institute in Washington, D.C.

Read more: Goodbye to Jumpy: Lessons for the Health System

Why Won't You Let Me Go?

Brian Smith lives in Oakland, California. His family's farm is in Stockton. This article was originally published on Medium and is republished with permission.

Dad was confused.

He was taking a combination of drugs that were keeping him alive and reducing his pain. His morphine dose was quite high.

The fact that he had even made it to 78 years old was amazing considering he survived California's polio crisis of the 1940s. But now it was coming back. Post-Polio Syndrome weakens muscles that were previously affected by the polio infection. This brilliant man was atrophying both mentally and physically before our eyes. Eventually, he would not be able to breathe. And there was no cure.

"When do we go?" he asked us. "Where are the other attorneys? This is an important deposition."

He was on a kind of mental auto-pilot, reliving 45 years of familiar work stress—not the way anyone wants to experience his final days.

"There are no more depositions," my wife explained in soothing tones. "Your job is done. You were one of California's finest lawyers and you helped build a respected firm in the Central Valley. You should be very proud of your legacy."

"Why won't you let me go?" he said with tears welling up in his eyes.

That cut straight to the issue at hand.

Read more: Why Won't You Let Me Go?

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You are the key to ensuring well-crafted Death with Dignity laws for all Americans. With your financial and volunteer help, the Death with Dignity National Center, a 501(c)(3), non-partisan, nonprofit organization, has been the leading advocate in the Death with Dignity movement. Individual contributions helped us pass new Death with Dignity laws in Washington and Vermont, defend the Oregon law, and provide education and outreach programs for the vitality of the Death with Dignity movement.

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