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Coping with the Death of a Loved One

Today's article is courtesy of Memorials of Distinction, gravestone specialists. Louise and the rest of their team understand how difficult it is when a loved on dies, and they've put together this information to help face the inevitable matter of dealing with the aftermath of a death.

When a loved one dies, there's a blur of decisions that have to be made and no matter how practical you are, dealing with the essentials can be tough when you have just suffered a bereavement, especially if it's a close relation or dear friend.

The funeral is often the hardest part when a loved one has died, but even once you've said your final goodbye, there's still a long list of tasks to complete and duties which must be carried out.

Some of these need to be seen to straight away while with others, there's the luxury of time. Here we've taken a look at how to deal with your loved one's personal possessions when the time comes.

When to face it
Rifling through a loved one's belongings can feel like a terrible invasion of privacy, even though logically you may know it's something which needs to be done. For some people, there's a desperate need to get matters seen to straight away, while others prefer to delay the inevitable; leaving things unchanged can be a comfort when the worst has happened.

Read more: Coping with the Death of a Loved One

This Week in the Movement

No one suspected the zombie apocalypse would look so cute.

Throughout the week, we keep people up-to-date about the Death with Dignity movement and other topics related to end-of-life care through Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest. Below are highlights from the last week.

Efforts regarding Death with Dignity:

Read more: This Week in the Movement

Death with Dignity Improves Hospice Awareness

Walking a labyrinth as part of hospice care

After an event to celebrate and remember people who've died at JHC Hospice in Worcester, Rev. John G. Pastor, reflected on changes he's seen in Massachusetts hospice care since the narrow defeat of the proposed Death with Dignity initiative in 2012. In an interview with The Worcester Telegram & Gazette, he remarked the most notable change has been more and more people are talking about hospice in a positive light:

It's good to have increased conversations, and even debates, about honoring wishes at end of life. Even though [the initiative] failed, it brought to light and affirmed our work in so many ways. There is really an awareness.

Others at the hospice event, including some who opposed the bill, also acknowledged the Death with Dignity initiative broadened the public discussion about hospice care. JHC Hospice Director Ann Marie LeBoeuf noted, "In our society, people are not comfortable talking about death. It is dark. But now that it was a public issue, people do speak of it and talk about what they want."

Read more: Death with Dignity Improves Hospice Awareness

This Week in the Movement

When you are in your final days of life, what will you want?

Throughout the week, we keep people up-to-date about the Death with Dignity movement and other topics related to end-of-life care through Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest. Below are highlights from the last week.

Efforts regarding Death with Dignity:

Read more: This Week in the Movement

A Growing Conversation About Death with Dignity

Daylin Leach on Death with Dignity

For years, many state lawmakers have been working quietly to put forward Death with Dignity legislation, and with the recent shift in the national conversation around end-of-life healthcare policy reform, some politicians are taking a more vocal stance. Within the last few years, Vermont Governor Peter Shumlin made Death with Dignity part of his campaign platform; New Jersey Assemblyman John Burzichelli introduced and is championing his proposed Death with Dignity legislation; and Pennsylvania State Senator Daylin Leach has begun being more vocal in his support for the Death with Dignity bill he proposed.

Read more: A Growing Conversation About Death with Dignity

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Defend dignity. Take action.

You are the key to ensuring well-crafted Death with Dignity laws for all Americans. With your financial and volunteer help, the Death with Dignity National Center, a 501(c)(3), non-partisan, non-profit organization, has been the leading advocate in the death with dignity movement. Member contributions helped us pass a new Death with Dignity law in Washington, defend the Oregon law, and provide education and outreach programs for the vitality of the death with dignity movement.

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