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This Week in the Movement

Dr. Sherwin B. Nuland, photo by Bob Child

Throughout the week, we keep people up-to-date about the Death with Dignity movement and other topics related to end-of-life care through Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest. Below are highlights from the last week.

Efforts regarding Death with Dignity:

  • Surgeon and author Dr. Sherwin B. Nuland died at his home in Hamden, CT due to prostate cancer. Dr. Nuland wrote the award-winning book How We Die to draw back the curtain to show the realities of death. An advocate of Death with Dignity laws, he wrote, "The final disease that nature inflicts on us will determine the atmosphere in which we take our leave of life, but our own choices should be allowed, insofar as possible, to be the decisive factor in the manner of our going."
  • Quinnipiac University released a poll which found 61% of Connecticut voters would support a Death with Dignity law in their state.
  • In his Indianapolis Monthly op-ed, Phil Gulley asked our nation to "extend me one more freedom, one more inalienable right—the privilege of ending my life when the sun of hope has set."
  • Elizabeth Jenkins-Donahue, a homecare nurse who knows the benefits of palliative care can't relieve the suffering of all patients, appealed to Connecticut lawmakers to give people more end-of-life options as would be allowed under a Death with Dignity law.

Read more: This Week in the Movement

Dying to Give Back to the Earth

Greensprings is located in New York's Finger Lakes region

Hunter Marshall is a hospice nurse, advocate for the right of Death with Dignity, and environmental activist from the Pacific Northwest. This article was originally published on Waging Nonviolence and appears here courtesy of a Creative Commons license.

I met with Jean shortly after she was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. As I approached her home for the first time, I was greeted by voluminous blue barrels at the bases of the gutters collecting rainwater from a passing storm. An attached hose snaked outwards towards a garden burgeoning into spring. She welcomed me inside with a warm smile that offset the cool air in her minimally-heated home. As a visiting nurse, I actively observe patients' homes with an eye towards safety and functionality. Jean's home, outside and in, was a testament to the more than 50 years she spent as an environmental activist.

Displaying a subtle yet undeniable eccentricity so common in activists, she served sparkling cider in champagne glasses while we discussed her end-of-life arrangements. Unsurprisingly, she wanted to die just as she had lived: green. So after a life of environmental stewardship, she was met with the daunting task of choosing how to most sustainably return her body to the earth.

Read more: Dying to Give Back to the Earth

This Week in the Movement

Barbara Mancini, photo by David M. Warren

Throughout the week, we keep people up-to-date about the Death with Dignity movement and other topics related to end-of-life care through Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest. Below are highlights from the last week.

Efforts regarding Death with Dignity:

Read more: This Week in the Movement

Honor Your Loved Ones by Facing Your Fears and Pursuing Your Passions

Irina Jordan

Irina Jordan is the owner of Artisurn—online marketplace of handcrafted cremation urns, jewelry and keepsakes. Connector. Optimist. Avid reader.

I got the dreaded call in the middle of the night; my mom told me my brother was a victim of a burglary in his apartment. He was only 22 years old. Since then, I've been haunted by memories of him and our times together.

He was a headstrong and charismatic guy who knew how to persuade others—including me—to do what he wanted and believed in: good and bad. He would've made an excellent leader in any professional field.

Memories, both bitter and sweet, tend to sneak up on me at unexpected moments and leave me turning them over and over in my mind. I have a Russian artist's seascape painting from my brother's apartment hanging in my house and it's a constant and symbolic reminder of my own mortality. My brother lived his life to the fullest, and to honor it, I've been on a quest to face my fears and pursue my passions.

Read more: Honor Your Loved Ones by Facing Your Fears and Pursuing Your Passions

This Week in the Movement

Throughout the week, we keep people up-to-date about the Death with Dignity movement and other topics related to end-of-life care through Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest. Below are highlights from the last couple weeks.

Efforts regarding Death with Dignity:

Read more: This Week in the Movement

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Defend dignity. Take action.

You are the key to ensuring well-crafted Death with Dignity laws for all Americans. With your financial and volunteer help, the Death with Dignity National Center, a 501(c)(3), non-partisan, nonprofit organization, has been the leading advocate in the Death with Dignity movement. Individual contributions helped us pass new Death with Dignity laws in Washington and Vermont, defend the Oregon law, and provide education and outreach programs for the vitality of the Death with Dignity movement.

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