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Staff Spotlight: Electronic Communications

Staff Spotlight: Electronic Communications

Melissa Barber, Electronic Communications

To help you get to know us on a more personal basis, we plan to periodically highlight a staff member on our blog. Last spring, we introduced you to our Outreach Staff. Now, we'd like you to meet our Electronic Communications Specialist, Melissa Barber.

If you ever liked us or posted a comment on our Facebook page, received a tweet, joined a TweetChat, or read our blog, Living with Dying, you've communicated with Melissa. While she loves the outdoors, you'll often find her inside behind her computer writing an email, answering the phone, or replying to an online comment in her work to educate people about the Death with Dignity National Center, accessing the Death with Dignity laws in Oregon and Washington, end-of-life care options, and the Death with Dignity movement at large.

Read more: Staff Spotlight: Electronic Communications

2011 Annual Report

I'm pleased to present our 2011 Annual Report detailing the organizational activities undertaken by the Death with Dignity National Center during fiscal year 2010-2011. Our nation is facing difficult times, and economic issues are at the forefront of all policy discussions. And, yet, donors to the National Center have been exceedingly generous this past year. Your support has made it possible for us to continue our work improving end-of-life options for terminally ill individuals.

Relationships. Partnerships. Networking. These are the keywords best describing our activities of the past year. Focused on grassroots organizing, staff and board members of the Death with Dignity National Center have forged important alliances with advocacy groups, interested individuals, and medical professionals throughout New England. The shift to New England from a focus on Washington and Oregon was necessitated by trends in the movement. Death with Dignity is no longer an issue viable only in a few states on the west coast. It's a policy experiencing broad public support around the country.

Read more: 2011 Annual Report

October TweetChat Recording: Personal Experiences with Death & Dying

Simply having the option to request medication under the Oregon and Washington Death with Dignity Acts appears to lead to better preparedness for death for both the patient and the family as well as a more informed populace of all end-of-life options (including hospice and palliative care). With How to Die in Oregon's return to HBO and two new guest posts on our blog this month, you're able to learn, first-hand, about the personal experiences with these states' laws.

But what are the dying experiences of people worldwide? Death is an experience we all share; yet, we rarely discuss it. During this month's TweetChat we explored this question.

Please read the transcript of the dialog about personal experiences with death and dying below.

Personal Experiences with Death & Dying

Read more: October TweetChat Recording: Personal Experiences with Death & Dying

October TweetChat: Personal Experiences with Death & Dying

Simply having the option to request medication under the Oregon and Washington Death with Dignity Acts appears to lead to better preparedness for death for both the patient and the family as well as a more informed populace of all end-of-life options (including hospice and palliative care). With How to Die in Oregon's return to HBO and two new guest posts on our blog this month, you're able to learn, first-hand, about the personal experiences with these states' laws.

But what are the dying experiences of people worldwide? Death is an experience we all share; yet, we rarely discuss it. Tomorrow, I hope you'll join our live online conversation through Twitter to add your voice to the dialog about personal experiences with death and dying.

To give you a little primer, here are the discussion topics for the TweetChat:

Read more: October TweetChat: Personal Experiences with Death & Dying

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Defend dignity. Take action.

You are the key to ensuring well-crafted Death with Dignity laws for all Americans. With your financial and volunteer help, the Death with Dignity National Center, a 501(c)(3), non-partisan, non-profit organization, has been the leading advocate in the death with dignity movement. Member contributions helped us pass a new Death with Dignity law in Washington, defend the Oregon law, and provide education and outreach programs for the vitality of the death with dignity movement.

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