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This Week in the Movement

VT House of Representatives, photo by PCV

Throughout the week, we keep people up-to-date with information about the Death with Dignity movement and other topics related to end-of-life care through Facebook and Twitter. Below are highlights from this week.

Efforts regarding Death with Dignity:

Read more: This Week in the Movement

Vermont House Passes Death with Dignity

VT Statehouse, photo by Mark Danielson on flickr

Vermont took another step toward allowing terminally ill people to decide the manner and timing of their deaths through a safeguarded process. Today, the Vermont House approved a bill emulating the time-tested Oregon and Washington Death with Dignity Acts by a vote of 81-64. The path has been a long one, and it still has a ways to go before a final version would be presented to Governor Shumlin.

Since its introduction to the full Senate for debate earlier this year, the proposed bill has taken a meandering path. In the Senate, the bill was drastically amended before being approved and sent to the state House. In the House, the Senate bill was introduced and referred to the House Human Services Committee for consideration.

After listening to hours of expert testimony, the committee voted to restore the original bill's safeguards, bringing it more in line with the existing Death with Dignity laws. Because of the changes to the structure of the bill, the House Judiciary Committee had to go through it with a fine tooth comb to make sure the proposed bill would work with existing Vermont laws.

Read more: Vermont House Passes Death with Dignity

Expert Analysis of Advance Directives

"Ask DDNC" is a new column created to serve as a resource for you. Today, we'll focus on advance directives. We consulted Ann Jackson, MBA, for her advice. Ann Jackson is former director of the Oregon Hospice Association and now consults about end-of-life issues and options.

Every state has an official advance directive and is appropriate for all capable adults, regardless of health status at the time it's completed. Its purpose is to protect your right to refuse medical treatment you don't want, or request treatment you do want if or when you aren't able to make such decisions yourself.

Many people aren't aware that, without an advance directive, everything will be done to preserve life—even when it's not likely CPR or other life-sustaining treatments will be successful. In this column, I'll use Oregon's as an example. The Oregon advance directive is straightforward and relatively easy to complete. You can complete Part B, Part C, or both, depending on your advance-planning needs. You must complete Part D and your health care representative, if you appoint one, must complete Part E—Part D is for your signature and the signatures of your witnesses, and Part E is to be signed by your health care representative accepting the appointment.

Read more: Expert Analysis of Advance Directives

POLST and How They Work with Advance Directives

Image care of the POLST website

This blog post is the fourth in a series of guest posts by Arashi about end-of-life care planning and documentation in honor of National Healthcare Decisions Day.

POLST forms are another type of end of life planning tool. POLST stands for Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment. They're also known as; medical orders on life-sustaining treatment (MOLST), medical orders on scope of treatment (MOST), or physician's orders on scope of treatment (POST). The first POLST program was developed in Oregon in 1991 to create a standardized, easily recognizable, portable document which is designed to be transferable and actionable throughout the entire medical community.

Read more: POLST and How They Work with Advance Directives

This Week in the Movement

Dr. Morris from How to Die in Oregon

Throughout the week, we keep people up-to-date with information about the Death with Dignity movement and other topics related to end-of-life care through Facebook and Twitter. Below are highlights from this week.

Efforts regarding Death with Dignity:

Read more: This Week in the Movement

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Defend dignity. Take action.

You are the key to ensuring well-crafted Death with Dignity laws for all Americans. With your financial and volunteer help, the Death with Dignity National Center, a 501(c)(3), non-partisan, nonprofit organization, has been the leading advocate in the Death with Dignity movement. Individual contributions helped us pass new Death with Dignity laws in Washington and Vermont, defend the Oregon law, and provide education and outreach programs for the vitality of the Death with Dignity movement.

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