Recent Updates

from our blog:

living with dying

read more from our blog


Engaging Allies and Learning the Issue

The Organizing Cycle care of COPA

Three states have laws permitting Death with Dignity: Oregon, Vermont, and Washington. Two have positive court decisions determining physicians cannot be prosecuted for prescribing medications to hasten death under certain narrow circumstances: Montana and New Mexico (under appeal). But if you live in another state and you want to help enact a Death with Dignity law, what steps can you take? This is the second in a series of five blog posts about early organizing efforts you can undertake to help pave the way for passing a law in your state.

In the first, I focused on the important first step of talking to your friends, neighbors, and family members about Death with Dignity and end-of-life care policy reform.

One of the interesting things about talking to your colleagues with intent about death and dying issues is you will find strong support in areas you did not even know existed. One political organizer told me she thought our supporters were as dedicated as the most dedicated volunteers in politics (teachers and firefighters are the most dedicated, in case you're curious).

Read more: Engaging Allies and Learning the Issue

Lessons Learned from Being a Caregiver for My Grandma

Irina's grandmother, Grunya

Irina Jordan was born and raised in Russia and moved to the US when she was 22 years old. She's the owner of Artisurn—online marketplace of handcrafted cremation urns, jewelry and keepsakes. Connector. Optimist. Avid reader.

My paternal grandmother, Grunya, had a stroke which paralyzed the left half of her body when she was 59 years old. She spent her entire life living in a village in the far east area of Russia raising her own chickens, milking her own cows, and planting her own fruits and vegetables. After her stroke, she had to leave her rural life behind and move in with us.

We lived in Khabarovsk, a big city by Amur River on the east side of Russia. I was 10 years old. In Russia, it's expected children take care of their aging parents and not place them in any kind of assisted living facilities.

I became my mother's helper: helping feed my grandma, get her around, make her bed, do her laundry and monitor her medications. My grandma lived with us for 5 years until she died at the age of 64.

Read more: Lessons Learned from Being a Caregiver for My Grandma

This Week in the Movement

Heather Mizeur

Throughout the week, we keep people up-to-date about the Death with Dignity movement and other topics related to end-of-life care through Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest. Below are highlights from the last couple weeks.

Efforts regarding Death with Dignity:

Read more: This Week in the Movement

A Will for the Woods

A Will for the Woods

A Will for the Woods is an information-packed documentary about green burials. This relatively new concept in the US is starting to gain traction throughout the country, and the film explores how the Green Burial Council is working with land trusts and cemetery professionals to develop new ways to honor clients' requests and preserve natural areas.

But more than that, it's an intimate and unflinching look at the journey a couple takes in planning for imminent death. Throughout most of the documentary, Clark Wang lives with non-Hodgkin lymphoma. He's a young psychiatrist who seeks aggressive treatment, but during the course of the film it becomes more and more apparent the cancer isn't responding to the treatments and is spreading with increased vigor. His wife, Jane Ezzard, is a psychiatric nurse, and perhaps because of their medical backgrounds, they both face his death head on and with plain frankness.

Read more: A Will for the Woods

Join National Healthcare Decisions Day...Because Your Decisions Matter

National Healthcare Decisions Day

Nathan Kottkamp is the founder and chair of National Healthcare Decisions Day.

Please help us make history, again. April 16, 2014, will be the seventh annual National Healthcare Decisions Day. The inaugural event, which was formally recognized by Congress and numerous state and local governments, included participation by 76 of the most prominent national healthcare, religious, and legal associations and organizations. By the second year, we over 700 local and state organizations throughout the country also participated. At every level, the goal of this nationwide initiative is to ensure that all adults with decision-making capacity in America have both the information and the opportunity to communicate and document their future healthcare decisions. The first year's results were impressive—over 750,000 people obtained resources to make their healthcare decisions known—but there remain millions of Americans to go.

Read more: Join National Healthcare Decisions Day...Because Your Decisions Matter

Pages

Defend dignity. Take action.

You are the key to ensuring well-crafted Death with Dignity laws for all Americans. With your financial and volunteer help, the Death with Dignity National Center, a 501(c)(3), non-partisan, non-profit organization, has been the leading advocate in the death with dignity movement. Member contributions helped us pass a new Death with Dignity law in Washington, defend the Oregon law, and provide education and outreach programs for the vitality of the death with dignity movement.

donate today